Instant Puliogere Mix

 

Puliodarai podi

Puliodarai (known across the nation more popularly as Tamarind rice)  is a must in temples, as travel food, in weddings and other social events.

Pulikachal the sauce that forms the base for this rice is a bit laborious ans has to be prepared with planning .  Fresh pulikachal certainly has its aroma and place but often for those in a hurry who need it as a fast food alternative an instant mix with all the merits of pulikachal is a boon. Commercially available mix of various brands are there in the market but home-made mix has its place and retains all the flavors and taste of the moist sauce. This mix can come handy at anytime when in a hurry and can be stored for at least a month at room temperature if no coconut is added as in Karnataka style.

 

Ingredients

Tamarind  small ball about the size of a lemon

Dry red chilies 10 (preferbly the long variety)

Peppercorns 1 tsp

Cumin seeds 1 tsp

Fenugreek ½ tsp

Coriander seeds 2 tbsp

Sesame 1½ or 2 tbsp

Chana dal  1 tbsp

Urad dal 1 tbsp

Jaggery shavings 1 tbsp

Turmeric powder  1 tsp

Salt 1 tbsp

For tempering

Oil 1 tsp

Mustard seeds 1 tsp

Peanuts  2 tbsp

Asafotida ½ tsp

Salt ¼ tsp

Method

  • Dry roast the sesame seeds in a wok till it starts spluttering and transfer to a plate to cool it.
  • Add a drop or two of oil in the same wok and roast the chilies on low flame till the aroma surfaces.
  • Transfer to a plate to cool and add the fenugreek seeds  to the wok and roast for a minute on low flame. Add the peppercorns to the wok followed by cumin seeds and when you start getting the aroma of pepper add the  lentils and roast till it starts turning golden in color. Transfer to  a plate and in the same wok roast the coriander seeds just enough to get the dry look and releases aroma;  transfer to the mix in the plate.
  • Now is the turn for tamarind to get a complete dry condition by flipping it in the wok for a minute or two. Add it to the chili plate and cool.
  • Blitz the chili and tamarind to get a coarse powder as they take longer to get powdered. Add the remaining roasted ingredients, salt, and turmeric powder and powder to fine state. Add jaggery shavings and run the blender for a few seconds.

This powder can be stored for a few weeks in an airtight container and used when needed.

  • For those who prefer to add the tempering to the mix before storing heat the oil in a wok and let the  mustard seeds splutter.  Add the peanuts, asafotida ad salt and roast till the peanuts are done and crunchy. Add the tempering to the mix and  and mix well.

Puliodarai mix is ready for use. To make puliodarai refer to Melakotai puliodarai given in the blog.

 

Puliyodarai made with the mix has a flavor its own and close to the Melkottai puliyodarai

 

Chef’s Note

  • In case you want get the Karanatka flavor roast a tablespoon of coconut grate or desiccated coconut till crisp and  blitz along with jaggery.  However, do remember to store in the refrigerator as coconut does not have long shelf-life.

Mysore Rasam

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Exotic … is how one describes this rasam! As the name implies, this rasam has its origin from Karnataka and unlike rasam known as “saaru” in this region, it is called Mysore Rasam. A specialty of this rasam is use of coconut, and as is the trend in Karnataka, desiccated coconut is used in many dishes, a tradition that possibly evolved as a technique to preserve excess coconuts from spoiling. I prefer to use fresh coconut as desiccated coconut gives a different aroma akin to coconut oil. No rasam powder is used here as the ingredients are freshly roasted and powdered. Another feature of Karnataka is add jaggery to rasam. Actually I prefer to add either jaggery or a pinch of sugar in rasam as such as it enhances the taste.

This rasam is normally thick in consistency and makes a wholesome mix with steamed rice.

Ingredients

Tamarind  lemon-sized/gooseberry-sized ball (1 tbsp pulp)

Arahar dal  2 tbsp (to be pressure cooked)

Turmeric powder ½ tsp

Salt 1 tsp

Tomato 2 medium-sized (blanched)

Curry leaves from 3 sprigs

Water 4 cups

Asafotida ¼ tsp

Mustard seeds 1 tsp

Ghee  1 tbsp

Powdered Jaggery ½tsp

For rasam powder

Red chilies     5

Peppercorns     1 tsp

Cumin seeds     1 tsp

Coriander seeds  1 tbsp

Chan dal        1 tsp

Grated Coconut  2 tbsp

Method

  • Add a few drops of ghee in a wok and roast the spices for the powder in the order chilies, pepper, cumin seeds, coriander seeds, and chana dal. The spices should be roasted on a low flame and just till the aroma is released to retain the aroma. Transfer to a dry plate and in the same wok dry roast the coconut till the moisture is gone. Transfer to the plate and wait for it cool. Transfer the cooled spices to a blender and blitz it to get a slightly coarse powder. Keep the powder aside and in the same blender puree the blanched tomatoes and fresh curry leaves.
  •  In the meantime pressure-cook the dal after adding turmeric powder to it and keep it ready.
  • Add salt to the tamarind extract in a wide vessel and boil it till the raw smell of tamarind is gone as it happens in less than 5 minutes. Add the puree and boil for another 2 minutes or a minute longer and add the mashed dal. Make up the volume to 4 cups or roughly 1 liter. When the mix starts boiling add the spice powder, jiggery, and asafotida. Switch off the flame as soon as the rasam starts frothing and boiling.
  • Heat ghee in a wok and add mustard seed when the ghee is hot. As soon as the seeds splutter transfer the tempered seeds to the rasam. Garnish with fresh coriander leaves and enjoy one of the heavenly rasams!

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Sakkarai Pongal

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Sakkarai pongal is made normally made with jaggery or some prefer it with sugar too. What is made on Sankaranthi is cooked in milk and has a different taste and thus sankaranathi pongal   is a little different in taste from traditional pongal. At home following Sankaranthi on Maattu Pongal day also it is traditional to make pongal and hence the variation without milk 🙂

Ingredients

Raw rice 1 cup

Moong dal ¼ cup

Jaggery 1½ cups

Ghee ¼ cup or less

Cardamom 4 (powdered)

Mace 2 petals (crushed)

Nutmeg powder  1 pinch

Cashew pieces 1 tbsp (10pieces sliced)

Raisin 1 tbsp

Saffron 1 pinch

Method

Quite similar to Sakaranthi pongal with variation in water added . More water added in place of milk.

  • Roast the dal and rice on slow fire until aroma is wafted.
  • Wash the dal-rice mix in water, add 3 cups water and pressure cook till done (4 to 5 whistles should do … 2 whistles in high flame and the rest in reduced flame)
  • While the rice is getting cooked melt the jaggery in a wok in ½ cup water and as it starts boiling strain it through a tea strainer to remove dirt and keep it ready.
  • Add a spoon of ghee in a wok and roast cashew and raisin and keep them ready. Soak the saffron a spoon of milk and keep ready
  • In the same wok transfer the mashed rice and keeping a low flame stir in  the  molten jaggery syrup and stir till evenly done. Add the remaining ghee and mix well. Add cashew-raisin, nutmeg powder, cardamom powder, mace and mix well.Add the saffron filaments in milk and mix well.
  • Serve hot

Sankaranthi Pongal ( 4 servings)

Harvest festival ,,, Sankaranthi is celebrated nationwide in different forms and among the South Indians too there are some differences although pongal is the basic dish for the day. Even today there are households that follow the tradition in cooking pongal on firewood and in earthen pots bought for the occasion .

At home we use bronze pots coated with lime and rice flour (basic idea to prevent the vessel from soot when cooked on firewood) as per the tradition and cook on gas flame.

 

Sankaranthi 2014
Sankaranthi

On festival day the rice is cooked in milk but can be done with less milk or no milk otherwise and the taste of course is distinct either way.

 

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Ingredients

Raw rice  1 cup

Moong dal  ¼ cup

Jaggery (powdered)  1½ cups

Milk 1 cup

Ghee ¼ cup or less

Cardamom 4 (powdered)

Mace 2 petals (crushed)

Nutmeg powder  1 pinch

Cashew pieces 1 tbsp (10pieces sliced)

Raisin 1 tbsp

Saffron 1 pinch

Method

  • Roast the dal and rice on slow fire until aroma is wafted.
  • Wash the dal-rice mix in water, add milk and 2 cups water and pressure cook till done (4 to 5 whistles should do ..2 whistles in high flame and the rest in reduced flame)
  • While the rice is getting cooked melt the jaggery in a wok in ½ cup water and as it starts boiling strain it through a tea strainer to remove dirt and keep it ready.
  • Add a spoon of ghee in a wok and roast cashew and raisin and keep them ready. Soak the saffron a spoon of milk and keep ready
  • In the same wok transfer the mashed rice and keeping a low flame stir in  the  molten jaggery syrup and stir till evenly done. Add the remaining ghee and mix well. Add cashew-raisin, nutmeg powder, cardamom powder, mace and mix well.Add the saffron filaments in milk and mix well.
  • Serve hot

Puli Injii

 

Ingredients

Fiberless ginger 100 g (grate half the ginger and sliver the rest as julienne)

Green chillies 8 to 10 (spliced into 1″ pieces)

Tamarind pulp (thick) from a medium lemon-sized ball soaked in hot water

Powdered jaggery 1 tbsp

Salt 1 tsp or to taste

Fenugreek powder 1 tsp (roast 1 tsp fenugreek seeds till brown and powder)

Asafotida ½ tsp

Turmeric powder ¾ tsp

Mustard seeds 1 tsp

Red chilli powder 1 tsp

Oil 3 tbsp (preferably sesame oil aka gingelly oil)

Method

  • Heat 1 tbsp oil in a wok and when hot saute the chilli pieces on a low flame. Add the ginger julienne and grated ginger and saute for a couple of minute.
  • Transfer the mix to a dish and keep aside to be used later.
  • Heat the remaining oil in the wok and let the mustard seeds crackle.
  • Transfer the tamarind pulp to the wok kept on a low flame and add turmeric powder, salt and jaggery to it.
  • When the mix starts thickening add the powdered fenugreek, asafotida and the sauteed chilli/ginger mix.
  • Leave it on low flame for two minutes and let the mix cool before transferring to a bottle.
  • Can be stored for 10 days in the refrigerator.

Mango Pachadi

Ingredients

Raw mango (medium-sized) 1 (cut into 1″ pieces to make 1 cup)

Tamarind pulp (from size of a marble)

Green chilli (slit) 1

Salt 1 tsp

Jaggery (crushed) 1/3 cup

Red chilli powder ½ tsp

Curry leaves  2 sprigs

Cumin powder ½ tsp

Turmeric powder ¼ tsp

Oil 1 tbsp

Rice flour 1 tsp

Mustard 1 tsp

Scrape the skin from the mango (no need to peel) and cut them into 1″ pieces.

Heat oil in a kadai and temper the mustard seeds. Add the slit chili and saute for a few seconds. Add the mango and saute for a minute. Add the tamarind pulp, turmeric powder, chili powder, cumin powder, salt, and crushed jaggery.  Cook till the mango is soft.

Make a paste of rice flour by adding two tbsp of water. Add the paste and curry leaves to the pachadi and let it come to a boil.

Remove from fire and serve hot or cold.

Tomato Pachadi (Sweet)

Toamto 3 Big

Tamarind 2 scales

Red chili 1

Chili 1/2 tsp

Jaggery (Crushed) 3 tbsp

Salt 1 tsp

Oil 1 tsp

Cumin seeds 1 tsp

Curry leaves 2 sprigs

Raisins 20

Blanch the tomatoes and puree them in the mixie along with the tamarind scales.

Heat oil in a pan and add the jeera to splutter. Add the puree, chili powder, salt and jaggery and let it boil on slow fire till it thickens.  Add the curry leaves, raisins and remove from fire.

In case the  pachadi is not thick enough add a paste of one spoon of cornflour mixed in water before removing from flame.